Pink Hollyhock

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Pink Hollyhock

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My passion is outdoor art photography with a main concentration dealing with landscapes, sunrises, sunsets, and Mother Nature activity. In each artwork I try to relate a certain feeling or beauty at that precise moment. I also pay attention to many details as I am taking and processing the photo.
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I have many of these beautiful flowers growing along side of our house in Emmett, Idaho.

Alcea , commonly known as hollyhocks, is a genus of about 60 species of flowering plants in the mallow family Malvaceae. Most species are native to southwest and central Asia, although a few are native to southeast Europe or Egypt. They are biennial or short-lived perennial plants growing to 3.5 m (11.48 ft) tall, with broad, rounded, palmately lobed leaves and numerous flowers (pink or yellow in the wild species) on the erect central stem.
The ultimate cottage garden choice, hollyhock sends up tall spires that cover themselves in flowers in beautiful colors. They’re easy to grow from seed — in fact, that’s usually the only way they are found in garden centers.
Most hollyhocks are biennials, that is, they grow only foliage the first year, flower the second, and die that fall. However, if you establish a stand of hollyhocks, they’ll reseed each year so there will always be plenty blooming. Interestingly, the flowers open from the bottom to the top of the spike throughout the summer.
These tall (up to 8 feet) beauties are ideal against fences or buildings where they can get natural support. Red forms are especially attractive to hummingbirds and butterflies.