Image from page 322 of “Our native birds of song and beauty, being a complete history of all the songbirds, flycatchers, hummingbirds, swifts, goatsuckers, woodpeckers, kingfishers, trogons, cuckoos, and parrots, of North America” (1893)

Image from page 322 of

Identifier: cu31924084820277
Title: Our native birds of song and beauty, being a complete history of all the songbirds, flycatchers, hummingbirds, swifts, goatsuckers, woodpeckers, kingfishers, trogons, cuckoos, and parrots, of North America
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Nehrling, Henry 1853-1929
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: Milwaukee, G. Brumder
Contributing Library: Cornell University Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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do such work as he, we might not haveany vines at all on which to grow grapes. There are many learned people who believethat the terrible disease, due to a small insect, which has destroyed so many of thefinest vine-yards in France, is caused by the wholesale killing of birds which takes placein that country. The Oriole may do some little harm in the waj indicated, but hisservices to man are very great and far outweigh the value of a few small fruits. Like all the Orioles the Golden Robin is an excellent cage bird. If fed and caredfor in the same way as the Mockingbird is treated in confinement, it thrives very well. It leaves its summer home in small scattered flocks late in August and early inSeptember. NAMES: Baltimobe Oriole, Golden Robin, Hangnest, Firebird, Baltimore Bird, Hangingbird, Golden Oriole. SCIENTIFIC NAMES: Coracias galbula Linn. (1758). ICTERUS GALBULA Coues (1880). Oriolusbaltimore Linn. (1766). Icterus baltimore Daud. (1810). Hyphantes baltimore Cass. (1867). XXXI

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1. ICTERUS BULLOCKI Bonap, 2. ICTERUS PARIS ORUM Boneip. 3. ICTERUS CUCULLATUS NliLSONl Ridow. 4. P^ROCEPHALUS RUBINEUS MEXICANUS Cones. BULLOCKS ORIOLE. 293 DESCRIPTION: Tail, slightly graduated. Male, adult: Bright orange; whole head, throat, and upper parts,black; wings, black, edged with white; lesser wing-coverts, orange; tail, black; the ijases of all thefeathers, yellow; tips of outer tail-feathers, orange; two white bands on the wings. Female: Palerand duller; black replaced by grayish-yellow; wings, brownish-black; orange replaced by olive-yellow.Males do not attain their full beauty of plumage until third year. Bill, bluish-black; feet, lead-colored.Length, 7.50 to 8.15 inches; wing, 3.70; tail, 3.10 inches. BULLOCKS ORIOLE. Icterus buUocki Bonaparte. Plate XXXI. Fig. 1. J^HE friend of Nature who for the first time enters California is surprised andastonished by the singular aspect of the landscape, by the many peculiar plants,trees, and shrubs, and by the many rare birds. E

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