Image from page 105 of “The new book of the dog : a comprehensive natural history of British dogs and their foreign relatives, with chapters on law, breeding, kennel management, and veterinary treatment” (1911)

Image from page 105 of

Identifier: newbookofdogcomp01leig
Title: The new book of the dog : a comprehensive natural history of British dogs and their foreign relatives, with chapters on law, breeding, kennel management, and veterinary treatment
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Leighton, Robert, 1859-1934
Subjects: Dogs
Publisher: London New York : Cassell
Contributing Library: Webster Family Library of Veterinary Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Tufts University

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end to man, andwill at command leap into the water fromthe highest precipice and in the coldestweather. They are remarkably voracious,but can endure hunger for a great length oftime, and they are usually fed upon theworst of salted fish. The true breed has become scarce anddifficult to be met with. They grow to a 76 THE NEW BOOK OF THE DOG. greater size than an English Mastiff, have afine close fur, and the colour is of variouskinds ; but black, which is the most approvedof, prevails. The smooth, short-haired dogso much admired in England as a New-foundland dog, though a useful and saga-cious animal and nearly as hardy andfond of the water, is a cross-breed. It It is somewhat difficult to reconcile theseremarks concerning Newfoundlands in Eng-land with what is known from other sourcesabout the same time, and it is contradictedas regards the smooth-coated dogs byLandseers picture. The smooth-coated dogsreferred to were probably of the Labradorbreed, and this view is confirmed bv Youatt

Text Appearing After Image:
MISS E. GOODALUS CH. GIPSY PRINCESS BY WOLF OF BADENOCH NUMBER PEERESS. Photograph by Russell. seems, however, to inherit all the virtuesof the true kind. A Newfoundland dogwill, if properly domesticated and trained,defend his master, growl when anotherperson speaks roughly to him, and in noinstance of danger leave him. This animalin a wild state hunts in packs, and is thenferocious, and in its habits similar to theWolf. They are fond of children and muchattached to members of the house to whichthey belong, but frequently cherish a crossantipathy to a stranger. While they willneither attack nor fight dogs of inferiorsize, they are ready to fight courageouslywith dogs of their own size and strength. So sagacious are these animals that theyseem to want only the faculty of speech tomake them fully understood, and they arecapable of being trained to all the purposesfor which almost every other variety of thecanine species is used. in his Book of The Dog, published in 18J5,in which he stat

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